Fund Report 2017

The scholarship fund was set up in 2009 and supported 10 students to remain in the education system. During the 8 years we have supported 76 students. 21 have successfully completed with a University degree, 5 now have a Diploma and 4 have completed grade 10 in the education system, which would otherwise have been impossible for them. This September, at our annual student meeting, we invited all past and present students. It was an excellent meeting where our graduate students, now in employment, spoke of their experiences and gave strong words of encouragement to those still in the education system. It was rewarding to see so many, successful, young people, very grateful for the opportunity we have been able to give them.

Please excuse the cap and gown. They awarded me a doctorate of something— this really belongs to all of you who give the support.

In 2016/2017, we supported a total of 44 students and paid to them the equivalent of £15,000.

On behalf of all the students we are helping, I thank everyone who has donated to the fund.

Thanks to the Lilly Foundation for their generous donation to the scholarship fund.

Special thanks are due to those who have spent time and energy organising fund raising activities. Doris Hogan, in Belgium, yet again organised a very successful fund raising event. Prestwick Bridge Club organised their first fund raising event and I was lucky to spend a very enjoyable afternoon there.
Special thanks also to Sarah Johnson, in America, who funded for some of our students to have their own computer.

Many thanks to our committees, June, Margaret and Morag in Scotland and Tefera, Habtamu and Teshale in Ethiopia. They all contribute their time to ensure the smooth operation of the fund.

Susan

You can download the full SASF Fund Report 2016-2017 as a PDF for printing or offline viewing

Fund Report 2016

What a crowd! The photograph was taken at our annual meeting in September and shows our Ethiopian committee, Tefera, Habtamu and Teshale, with some of our existing and some of our new students.

In 2015/2016, we supported a total of 40 students and paid to them the equivalent of £11,342. 8 graduated from University, 3 with BSc degrees in Engineering, 1 with BSc in Chemistry, 1 with BSc in Animal Science, 2 with BA degrees in Management and 1 with a BA degree in Economics. One girl, unfortunately, did not complete her university course.

We supported Fiker Getnet last year to study Electrical Engineering at the Maritime Academy in Addis Ababa. He successfully completed his course and is now on the high seas, last heard of in China.

Destaw Temesgen graduated in 2015 with a BSc in Civil Engineering. He was working in Addis Ababa but competed, and won, a scholarship from the Ethiopian Roads Authority and is now back at University, studying for his Masters degree. Two of our students were unsuccessful in getting a place in grade 11. They have left the fund.

Two of our students, who were unsuccessful in gaining a place in grade 11, have joined the local FE College and we have agreed to support them throughout their programme. One girl from grade 12 did not get a place at University and we are continuing to support her at the Medical College in Dessie, where she is studying nursing.

28 of our students are continuing in the fund in session 2016/2017. We have taken on 16 new students and are therefore supporting 44 young people this year. 17 are at University, 4 are at college and 23 are in various stages of the school system.

Many thanks to our committees, June, Margaret and Morag in Scotland and Tefera, Habtamu and Teshale in Ethiopia. They all contribute their time to ensure the smooth operation of the fund.

The fund was started because of the generosity of the members of Hamilton Bridge Club. A Bridge tournament was again held this year and the proceeds were added to the fund. Thanks to everyone who has donated throughout the year. There are far too many to mention here but I hope that you have all had a personal thank you. Without your donations there would be no fund and these young people would not get the support they need to give them the chance of a life out of poverty.

Susan

You can download the full SASF Report 2015-2016 as a PDF for printing or offline viewing

Fund Report 2015

In September we had a meeting, and lunch, at Ben Abeba Restaurant. This is always a good time for a meeting as it is Ethiopian New Year and many of our students are home for that holiday. The picture shows some of our graduating students, our continuing students and our new students.

In 2014/2015, we supported 27 young people in various stages in the education system. They have continued to pay us back by working hard and achieving good results. Yet again there has been no ‘drop outs’ during the year. The main reason for this is the careful screening of applicants given by the Lalibelan committee. This ensures that the young people we help are those with the greatest need.

In 2014/2015 the equivalent of £7,800 has been distributed to the students.

7 of our students graduated from University this year. We now have 1 Doctor, 2 Nurses, 1 Civil Engineer, 1 Electrical Engineer, 1 Agricultural Scientist and 1 Economist. The electrical engineer has been successful in gaining a place at the Maritime College in Addis Ababa for a year’s specialist training. His fees, accommodation and food are all supplied and we have agreed to continue our ‘pocket money’ support of 600 Birr per month.

3 of our grade 10 students were not successful in gaining a place in grade 11. This is the large cut off point when 3,000 students are trying for 300 places! 2 girls have decided not to go to college. I am delighted that we have taken them to grade 10 level which is more than many young girls attain. The 3rd. student has enrolled in the Further Education College and plans to sit the grade 10 national exam again in May. We are continuing to support him at college.

This has left us with 19 continuing students.

Due to everyone’s generosity, we have taken on 21 new students. We therefore have a total of 40 students getting support from the fund in 2015/2016.

As you can imagine, it needs a lot of pieces of paper to give you information about all the students. 3 years ago my brother Richard set us up with a website, at no cost to the fund. His colleague, Simon Knee has now streamlined the website also at no cost. I am very grateful to them both. I will post the information about all our students on the website.

Thank you to Hamilton Bridge Club, which is responsible for the setting up of the fund. Their annual tournament again topped up the money in the bank. Thanks to all those who have set up a standing order, and paid money regularly into the account. Thanks to everyone who has made donations throughout the year. Thanks to the visitors to Lalibela who have given money in support.

A special thank you is due to Doris Hogan who is presently living in Addis Ababa. In May, she organised an Ethio Jazz concert at Ben Abeba Restaurant. No one involved charged any money and all the proceeds, 40,000 Birr, went into the fund. It was a very special evening with wonderful music from Monika Manaker and Girum.

The scheme could not run without the support of the 2 committees. All the members give their time, and expertise, without any payment. Tsegenet has left the Lalibelan committee and I thank her for all her help. She has been replaced by Teshale (read his story here) who has been supported through University by the fund. Thank you Tefera, Habtamu, Tsegenet and Teshale in Lalibela and June, Margaret and Morag in Scotland.

It is difficult to find the words to describe the difference this money is making to the lives of these young people. Please, yet again, accept my thanks for remembering us out here and for your continual support.

Susan

You can download the full SASF Report 2014-2015 as a PDF for printing or offline viewing

Don’t forget you can view the stories of all of our students, year-by-year, by clicking on any of their names in the menu of “Young People Funded” on the left. Or you can click the “tag” of their name at the bottom of any article about them to see their full story in the fund.

Fund Report 2014

This year I am starting with Mebratu’s story as it is such a good example of the scholarship fund in practice. Mebratu was one of the original 10 students we supported. He is now in full time employment as a teacher, which is giving back so much to other students. In addition, his uneducated family now appreciate the power of education. Hopefully the next generation of his family will all have the opportunity to access schooling.

MEBRATU-TSEHAYNEW-2009September  2009 

Mebratu made successful application for the scholarship fund. He was a grade 12 student with ambition to go to university. He has 9 brothers and sisters, none of whom has had education. His parents wanted him to give up his education, marry and work as a farmer. Our support enabled him to continue his education.

MEBRATU-TSEHAYNEW-2013July 2103

Graduation day!
Mebratu now has a BSc. In Biology.

November 2014

Mebratu has now completed a teacher training course and is in full time employment, teaching Biology, to grades 9 to 12, in a secondary school in Kolmask.

MEBRATU-TSEHAYNEW-2014I asked him how his family now feel about him and his answer was that they now listen to him!

His youngest sister is now 14 and completed grades 1 and 2 before dropping out of education to work at home. Mebratu has insisted that she return to the education system and he is supporting her through this.

You can view the stories of all of our students, year-by-year, by clicking on any of their names in the menu of “Young People Funded”.

In 2013/2014, we supported 22 young people in various stages in the education system. They have continued to pay us back by working hard and achieving good results. I am pleased to say that there has been no ‘drop outs’ this year. The main reason for this is the careful screening of applicants given by the Lalibelan committee. This ensures that the young people we help are those with the greatest need. They are all very grateful for the support, without which they would not be able to remain in the education system. I am constantly receiving their thanks, when the thanks are due to all of you.

In 2013/2014 the equivalent of £6,140 has been distributed to the students.

Thank you to Hamilton Bridge Club, which is responsible for the setting up of the fund. Their annual tournament again topped up the money in the bank. Thanks to all those who have set up a standing order, and paid money regularly into the account. Thanks to everyone who has made donations throughout the year. Thanks to the visitors to Lalibela who have given money in support.

A special thank you is due to Roisin Sharp, and her family, who have been fund raising for most of the year and have contributed more than £1,500. I am amazed that auctioning 4 kittens could raise £350, enough to keep a young person in the education system for almost 18 months.

A special thank you is also due to Doris Hogan who is presently living in Addis Ababa. She held an exhibition of her Ethiopian photographs and donated the money made to the fund. This was an amazing 12,000 birr.

Many of our students are disadvantaged by not having a computer. Last year Sheena McCall funded for computers for 2 of our students. This year Pat Snook found a company in England, computers4africa, which reconditions old computers and sells them very cheaply if they are to be used by students in Africa. Pat brought a computer for one of the students on her recent visit and it has been possible to get another 2 brought over. If anyone is planning a visit, and has spare luggage space, please let me know and I can organise to get a computer to you to carry over.

The scheme could not run without the support of the 2 committees. All the members give their time, and expertise, without any payment. Thank you Tefera, Habtamu and Tsegenet in Lalibela and June, Margaret and Morag in Scotland.

Two of our young people graduated this year and are not now being supported by the fund. Due to everyone’s generosity, we have been able to add 6 new young people to the programme. This means that we will be supporting 26 young people during 2014/2015. As 10 of our students are scheduled to graduate in 2015, we are expecting to be able to accept a large intake of new students in session 2015/2016.

SASF-logoIt is difficult to find the words to describe the difference this money is making to the lives of these young people. Please accept my thanks for remembering us out here and for your continual support.

Fund Report 2013

The 2013/2014 scholarship students pictured with Tefera, the chairman of the Lalibelan committee.

The photograph was taken at the annual student meeting in September 2013. The meeting gives the students an opportunity to network, with the older students being able to give support to the younger ones.

We are now into year 5 of the scholarship fund and it is time for an annual report.

In 2012/2013, we supported 18 young people in various stages in the education system. They have continued to pay us back by working hard and achieving good results. I am pleased to say that there has been no ‘drop outs’ this year. The main reason for this is the careful screening of applicants given by the Lalibelan committee. This ensures that the young people we help are those with the greatest need. They are all very grateful for the support, without which they would not be able to remain in the education system. I am constantly receiving their thanks, when the thanks are due to all of you.

In 2012/2013 the equivalent of £6,092 has been distributed to the students.

Thank you to Hamilton Bridge Club, which is responsible for the setting up of the fund. Their annual tournament again topped up the money in the bank. Thanks to all those who have set up a standing order, and paid money regularly into the account. Thanks to everyone who has made donations throughout the year. Thanks to the visitors to Lalibela who have given money in support.

Sheena McCall deserves a special thank you. She has supplied 2 computers for the students, which have been given to Fiker and Destaw. Both boys are now in their 4th. year studying engineering and were being disadvantaged by the lack of a computer.

To everyone, please accept my thanks on behalf of the young people here. You are all making such a difference to their lives and their ambitions for the future.

The scheme could not run without the support of the 2 committees. All the members give their time, and expertise, without any payment. Maureen, in Scotland, has resigned from the committee and we thank her for all the support she has given over the years. Morag MacDonald has agreed to take her place on the Scottish committee. Mamo has resigned from the Lalibelan committee and we also give him our thanks. Tsegenet has agreed to replace him on the committee.

In May this year the Scottish committee were successful in registering the fund as a Scottish charity. We are now Scottish charity number SCO44015. This will mean that we can claim gift aid from donations made. Once we have sorted this out with the Inland Revenue, we will send out the information. Thanks to June and Margaret for their work in making this possible.

Four of our young people graduated this year and are not now being supported by the fund. Due to everyone’s generosity, we have been able to add 8 new young people to the programme. This means that we will be supporting 22 young people during 2013/2014.

SASF-logoIt is difficult to find the words to describe the difference this money is making to the lives of these young people. Please accept my thanks for remembering us out here and for your continual support.

Fund Report 2012

We are now into year 4 of the scholarship fund and it is time for an annual report.

In 2011/2012, we supported 16 young people in various stages in the education system. They have continued to pay us back by working hard and achieving good results. I am pleased to say that there has been no ‘drop outs’ this year. The main reason for this is the careful screening of applicants given by the Lalibelan committee. This ensures that the young people we help are those with the greatest need. They are all very grateful for the support, without which they would not be able to remain in the education system. I am constantly receiving their thanks, when the thanks are due to all of you.

In 2011/2012 the equivalent of £4,835 has been distributed to the students.

Thank you to Hamilton Bridge Club, which is responsible for the setting up of the fund. Their annual tournament again topped up the money in the bank. Thanks to all those who have set up a standing order, to pay money regularly into the account. Thanks to everyone who has made donations throughout the year. Thanks to the visitors to Lalibela who have given money in support.

To everyone, please accept my thanks on behalf of the young people here. You are all making such a difference to their lives and their ambitions for the future.

The scheme could not run without the support of the 2 committees. All the members give their time, and expertise, without any payment. Thank you to June, Margaret and Maureen in Scotland and to Tefera, Habtamu and Mamo in Lalibela.

My role here has been in ensuring that all the young people get their money every month. Those at University get it paid into their bank account. Those in Lalibela come to collect the money in cash. I feel it is now time to look at a system, which will operate without my direct involvement. The cahier at Ben Abeba restaurant, Tsegenet, has volunteered to take on my role in the system. Both committees have agreed that she will get paid 200 birr (approximately £7) per month for this work. I hope that you are all happy with this administrative payment being made.

Five of our young people graduated this year and are not now being supported by the fund. Due to everyone’s generosity, we have been able to add 7 new young people to the programme. This means that we will be supporting 18 young people during 2012/2013.

It is difficult to find the words to describe the difference this money is making to the lives of these young people. Please accept my thanks for remembering us out here and for your continual support.
For the first time we have young people moving into the category of ‘past’ students. In August, most of the students met for lunch at Ben Abeba restaurant. Congratulations were given to those completing their studies. Encouragement was given to those still in the system.

Fund Report 2011

With grateful thanks to everyone who has supported.
You are giving us the chance to make our dreams become reality.

We are now into year 3 of the fund.

Please accept my apologies for the delay in writing the annual report. Nothing happens quickly in Ethiopia and I have been waiting to see where all our young people will be this year.

In year 2 the equivalent of £4,476 has been distributed to the students. The official University results for semester 2 are not given out until the students return to University. I am still waiting to be sent the results for 5 students, which will mean additional bonus payments of approximately £50.

SEFI-MELAKU-2011We made the decision to take on no new students this year as we still had the 16 students from last year. This is the last year of support for Getenet and Tarko. Desta may also finish this year. This will mean we can probably take on new people to support next year. We will issue application forms at the end of January. The Lalibelan committee will screen and check the validity of the applications and select the most deserving 10. These applications will be sent to the Scottish committee who match the applications with the bank balance and choose those to support. There will be positive discrimination towards young girls who show the potential to benefit from education. The number we can support is directly related to the money in the bank.

DESTAW-TEMESGEN-GELAYE-2011I am delighted with the performance of the young people. They have been taking full advantage of our support. Yonas was home during the summer and was fêted by the whole of his village. His achievement is something they perhaps don’t fully understand, but they are so proud of him. We nearly didn’t give Destaw support and he has turned out to be such a lovely young man. He is just so grateful for our support.

The bank balance is looking healthy thanks to everyone’s generosity. I hope that everyone has received a personal thank you. If not, please accept my apologies and my thanks. A special mention must go to Hamilton Bridge Club. They have ownership of the fund, as they were responsible for the first money that set it up. They continue this support every year. A special thank you must go to Joan and Jack who donated the £760 they received in wedding presents to the fund. This money alone keeps 2 young people in the education system for a year.

DESTA-ABEBAW-2011In August we held a meeting in Lalibela for all the students we support. 13 of the 16 were able to attend. They asked if they could form an association in order to keep in touch with each other. Fiker agreed to coordinate this association. Realistically, as the students are now all over Ethiopia, they will only be able to meet together every summer.

Be assured that 100% of the money given reaches the young people. Both committees give their time with no charge to the fund. I am taking this opportunity to give my personal thanks to:
Tefera, Habtamu and Mamo from Lalibela and June, Margaret and Maureen from Scotland. All your time and effort is much appreciated.

I am the lucky one as I get to meet the young people and I receive all the thanks from them. These thanks are due to all of you who have given support and I would like to pass them on to you. If you have not yet visited Lalibela, I hope that you will soon have time to come and receive in person the thanks you are due.

Fund Report 2010

Year one has now passed with very few problems. 9 of the 10 students we supported have completed the year.

Adane Akane was the only ‘drop-out’ from last year’s students. As he did not get the teacher training course he wanted, he did a second year at the vocational school. He has not been getting support from the fund to do this. I am delighted to say that, at the third attempt, he has achieved a high enough grade to gain entry to grade 11. He is a very happy person and comes to my Saturday English class for additional support. He will perhaps apply to the fund again in the future!

BAYE-TESFAW-2010The education system here is very ‘challenging’! Students don’t start grade 1 until they are 7 years old. They then do 8 years in elementary school. There are elementary schools all over the region. At the end of grade 8, they sit national examinations and, if successful, they are promoted to grade 9.
All grade 9 and 10 students from the area attend secondary school in Lalibela. This means 2,000+ students in grade 9 and the same in grade 10. The course is very academic and there is no choice of subjects. All students expect to go to University and most have ambitions to be a doctor, as doctors are the most respected people in Ethiopia. There are again National Examinations at the end of grade 10. However, there are only 200 places in grade 11, so 1,800 young people are ‘failures’, as they don’t get a place in the preparatory school.

SEFI-MELAKU-2010In Lalibela there is a vocational school, which offers a variety of skill courses. Students have to pay to attend, and many just don’t have the money. The fees can vary, but are approximately 100 Birr per month (£5). Students at college refer to themselves as 10+ students.

Grades 11 and 12 are taught in the preparatory school in Lalibela. There are again national examinations at the end of grade 12. Students are asked to give 5 course choices. The government then decides who will go where. Hopefully, they will be placed in one of their 5 choices!

YONAS-GEDAMU-2010There are still many children who do not enter the education system. The Ethiopian government has committed to having every 7 year-old child in the system by the year 2015. This has meant children being forced to school, against the parent’s wishes. As there are not enough school buildings, teachers and resources, many children give up, even before the end of grade 1.

A grade 1 teacher is paid approximately £30 per month and will regularly have classes of 70+, few textbooks and little paper. It is very much ‘chalk and talk’, except chalk is sometimes in short supply!

A problem the committee in Lalibela had this year was finding girls for our support. Girls in the education system tend to be from wealthier families, and therefore not needing support. The committee are going to try to find younger girls that we could support through the system.

ABEBE-SALEHU-WELEARGAY-2010The 9 students from last year are being supported for another year. 61 applications were made for support this year. From these we have taken on an additional 7 students, giving a total of 16 young people that we are helping. As you will see, they are not all the ‘clever’ ones. We have agreed to support a number of them at vocational school, and therefore give them an opportunity to find employment in the future.

Thank you for your support.

It takes very little money to keep a young person in the education system. Every donation is much appreciated.

Susan

Fund Report 2009

I am delighted to say that the fund is now in operation. Many thanks to all who have contributed. I hope that you will be happy with the way your money is being spent. I have had the pleasure of meeting the children and telling them about the support.

Their smiles said it all for me!

The committee in Lalibela has selected the 10 most deserving young people from the 38 applicants. The committee in Scotland has agreed that all 10 should be given support this year.

The stories are very similar as all the children are from very poor backgrounds. I am delighted that such a range of young people has been selected. We are supporting University students, College students, Vocational school students and some young people who would not be able to continue at school without our support.

 

baye-2009-2010Baye who could not attend the ‘group’ photograph.